Guthrie Genealogy

GENETIC GENEALOGY of GUTHRIE FAMILY GROUP 2A

Rev. Robert Elton Guthrie Jr & Lucy Kelsall

GFG2A - BRANCH B - CLUSTER 1

Rev. Robert Elton Guthrie Jr

Son of Robert Elton Guthrie Sr & Eva Catherine Spawr

Birth: 4 July 1819

Location: Pickaway, Ohio, USA

Marriage: 26 August 1845 in Randolph County, Illinois, USA

Occupation: Methodist Episcopal Minister

Death: 31 May 1892

Location: Wichita, Sedgwick, Kansas, USA

Buried:  Maple Grove Cemetery

Lucy Kelsall

Daughter of George Kelsall & Elizabeth Rundle

Birth: 23 February 1826

Location: Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Sons: George K, Robert Elton, William H, Edwin Ray, Fred

Daughters: Catharine, Sarah Frances, Lucy May, Mary, Ada, Maggie

Death: 6 December 1895

Location: Wichita, Sedgwick, Kansas, USA         

Buried: Maple Grove Cemetery 

The Highlights:

1819: BIRTH of ROBERT ELTON GUTHRIE

1826: BIRTH of LUCY KELSALL

1826: GUTHRIE FAMILY EMIGRATION FROM OHIO TO ILLINOIS

1830: CENSUS of TAZWELL COUNTY, ILLINOIS
ROBERT GUTHRIE HOUSEHOLD: 1M&1F 30-39 (1791-1800), 2M&1F 10-14 (1816-1820), 3M 5-9 (1821-1825), 2M&1F<5 (1826-1830). 

1840: CENSUS of MCLEAN COUNTY, ILLINOIS
ROBERT GUTHRIE HOUSEHOLD: 1M&1F 40-49 (1791-1800), 1M 20-24 (1816-1820), 1M 15-19 (1821-1825), 1M&1F 10-14 (1826-1830), 1F 5-9 (1831-1835), 1M<5 (1836-1840). 1 in manufacturing & trade. 

1841: METHODIST EPISCOPAL MINISTER

1845: MARRIAGE of REV. ROBERT ELTON GUTHRIE & LUCY KELSALL 
They were married at the residence of Lucy's father in Randolph County. 

1846: BIRTH of DAUGHTER, CATHARINE GUTHRIE
Catharine, called 'Kate', was born on 6 July 1846 in Illinois. She married Charles W. Atkinson on 3 Oct 1866 in McLean County,Illinois. They had several children. Charles died in 1914. Kate died on 13 October 1930 in Normal, McLean, Illinois.

1848-1849: BIRTH & DEATH of SON, GEORGE K. GUTHRIE
George was born on 7 April 1848. He died in Kansas on 22 July 1849. 

1850: CENSUS of ???? 
Perhaps due to the itinerant nature of his calling as a minister, I have not been able to locate Robert & family in the 1850 census. 

1850: BIRTH of SON, ROBERT E. GUTHRIE
Named for his father & grandfather, Robert was born on 13 March 1850. He married Martha Jane Leaton in 1872. They were the parents of 5 daughters. They lived in Witchita through the 1900 census, but were living in Washington D.C. by 1810 where they remained through the 1820 census. Robert died in Washington D.C., but was returned to Kansas to be buried in Maple Grove Cemetery. Section A, Lot 145, Grave 3, next to parents' graves. Alternate DOD 13 Mar 1921. His wife died in 1933. 

1851: BIRTH of SON, WILLIAM H. GUTHRIE
The "H" could possibly stand for Haines, which was a middle name used by Robert's parents in naming one of his brothers. William was born on 10 November 1851 in Illinois. He died at 10 years, 9 months, 24 days on 3 Sep 1862.

1855: BIRTH of SON, EDWIN RAY GUTHRIE
Born in February of 1855, Edwin Ray Guthrie is the direct ancestor of DNA Project participant Peter MacDonald Prenzel-Guthrie. He married Hattie Louise Pickett in 1885. They were living in Nebraska as of the 1900 census. The 1910 census indicates that she was a school teacher and he sold Pianos. They were the parents of 3 sons and 2 daughters. Edwin died in 1935 in Ashland, Saunders, Nebraska, and his wife Hattie died there in 1921.

1858: BIRTH of DAUGHTER, SARAH GUTHRIE
Census records suggest that Sarah remained unmarried. Her middle initial may have been F, T, or H according to the census transcriptions. She was living with her brother Robert Elton Guthrie's family in Sedgwick, Kansas for a time and then with her youngest sister Maggie Cummings' through the 1910 census.  

1860: CENSUS of BLOOMINGTON WARD 1, McLEAN, ILLINOIS, USA
GUTHRIE HOUSEHOLD: Robert E. 40 Clergyman M.E. 640 400 Ohio; Lucy 34 MD, Catherine 14 ILL, Robert E 10 ILL, William H. 7 ILL, Edwin R. 5 ILL, Sarah 3 ILL, Lucy M 2/12. 

1862: BIRTH of DAUGHTER, MARY GUTHRIE
Mary was born in Illinois about 1862 according to census records. She is enumerated with her parents in 1870 & 1880. Not found in the 1900 census as a Guthrie, so she might have married sometime after 1880. No further info. 

1865: BIRTH of SON, FRED L. GUTHRIE
Fred was born in Illinois about 1865. He was enumerated with the family in 1870 & 1880, but I have not located him in the 1900 census. There is a Fred L. Guthrie mentioned in this resource on Witchita, Sedgwick, Kansas that could possibly be the same man. No further info. 

1867: RETIREMENT FROM THE MINISTRY
"Mr Guthrie, in 1867, was superannuated by the Methodist Conference, and subsequently turned his attention to the improvement of his farm in Belleflower Township." 

1867: BIRTH of DAUGHTER, ADA GUTHRIE
Ada was born on 24 March 1867 in Illinois. She married Clarence E. Fonda of Sedgwick County, Kansas in 1897. They were the parents of several children. They remained residents of Witchita. Ada died on 27 May 1943 in Seattle, Washington where she was most likely visiting her brother Edwin & family. She was buried back home in Witchita in the Maple Grove Cemetery of Sedgwick County, Kansas in Plot Section H, Lot 246, Grave 3. Her husband Clarence had died back in 1909 on the 26th of June. He is also buried at Maple Grove Cemetery Section H, Lot 246, Grave 2.

1868: ELECTED CLERK of the CIRCUIT COURT
Held the position for 4 years after which he chose not to seek reelection. 

1870: CENSUS of BLOOMINGTON, McLEAN, ILLINOIS, USA 
GUTHRIE HOUSEHOLD: Robert E. 50 Clerk of Circuit Court 10,000 1,000 OH, Lucy 44 keeping house MD. Robert E 20 Deputy C Clerk 1,500 IL; Edwin 15 at school, Sarah F 12 at school, Mary 10 at school, Bell 8 at school, Fred L 5, Ada 3, Maggie 6/12, + servant 16

1876: PROPERTY PURCHASE in WICHITA, SEDGWICK, KANSAS, USA
"Rev Robert E. Guthrie, capitalist, made his first advent into Witchita in 1876, and purchased 12 lots facing on Central avenue, east on River street and west on Sherman, besides 320 acres 2-1/2 miles north of Douglas avenue in the township."

1880: CENSUS of BELL FLOWER, MCLEAN, ILLINOIS, USA 
GUTHRIE HOUSEHOLD: Robert E. 60 Farmer OH PA PA; Lucy 54 wife keeping house MD ENG ENG; Edwin R. 25 son works on farm IL; Mary B 18 dau @ home IL; Lucy M. 20 dau teacher IL; Fred L 15 son @ home IL; Ada 13 dau IL; Maggie 10 dau IL. 

1892: DEATH of REV. ROBERT ELTON GUTHRIE
Died 31 May 1892 in Witchita, Sedgwick, Kansas, USA. Buried at Maple Grove Cemetery Section A, Lot 145, Grave 2 

1895: DEATH of LUCY KELSALL GUTHRIE
Died 6 November 1895 in Witchita, Sedgwick, Kansas, USA. Buried at Maple Grove Cemetery  Section A, Lot 145, Grave 1. 

Excerpt: The Good Old Times in McLean County Illinois, by E. Duis

Rev. Robert Elton Guthrie.

Robert Elton Guthrie was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, on the Fourth of July, 1819. His life is pretty well shown in the foregoing sketch of his father. When his father took up the business of plastering and carpentering, the eldest son John was apprenticed to Lewis Bunn to learn the trade of blacksmith, while Robert learned his father's trade. He was a stout lad and soon became quite skillful in the use of tools, and a great support to the family. His services were so important that he went very little to school, only five months to Mr. Amasa C. Washburn in an old log school-house that stood in the crossing of Main and Olive streets.

In the spring of 1835 Mr. James Miller and his brother-inlaw, Mr. Moore, came to Bloomington, and this so strengthened the Methodist community that they built a church and finished it in the fall of 1836. This was done under the charge of Rev. Zadoc Hall now of the Central Illinois Conference. Before this all religious services had been held in the court house. In the fall of 1836 Rev. S. W. D. Chase was stationed at Bloomington under Rev. John St. Clair.as presiding elder. During the following winter the community was awakened by a great revival and among the converts were John, Margaret, Robert and Jacob Guthrie. This revival had a great influence upon the morals of Bloomington.

After his conversion Robert Guthrie determined to be a minister of the gospel and considered this his solemn duty. He studied, when he could snatch a moment's time from his work, and recited to Rev. Richard Haney, who had succeeded Mr. Chase as pastor of the church at Bloomington. At the Illinois Annual Conference held at Jacksonville in September, 1841, Mr. Guthrie was admitted on trial on the recommendation of the quarterly conference of Bloomington station. He was appointed to travel the Wauponsett mission and his work that year had for its outposts the Mazon settlement, South Ottawa, Vermilionville, Long Point, Pontiac and Indian Grove, where the town of Fairbury now stands, and all the intermediate territory. He made this circuit every three weeks, with nineteen regular and from two to six extra appointments. This kept Mr. Guthrie very busy, and he was obliged to read and study in the saddle while going from point to point. For his year's salary he received fifty dollars from the missionary fund and twenty-five or thirty dollars collected on his circuit, paid principally in articles of clothing, money being almost out of use at that time. At the close of his pastoral year he was presented with some half a dozen pairs of socks and fifteen pounds of wool. He carried the wool to Ottawa on horseback and sold it for an order on a store for three dollars. The result of his first year's work was the addition of twenty-five or thirty members to the church. The following year was marked by a sweeping revival, which extended over the whole circuit. The next five years were spent by Mr. Guthrie in the traveling circuits in the southern part of the State, which was then all within the Illinois Conference, He was many times troubled with regard to his financial matters, as his salary was barely enough to keep him in the necessaries of life. The great flood was in the year 1844, and as his work embraced the section of the country bounded on the south and east by the Mississippi and Big Muddy Kivers, and on the west by the Kaskaskia, he had great difficulty in traveling from one point to another. He was often obliged to ride through water on the bottom lands for many miles, and sometimes was compelled to swim his horse. His salary for this labor was one hundred dollars a year, and was paid by the people in calves, pigs, corn, oats, castor-beans, pork, hoop-poles, barrel staves, barrels, and orders on stores; nevertheless he was happy, knowing that he was engaged in a useful and blessed work. In 1844 he was appointed to the Jonesboro circuit, in Union County, and received only forty-five dollars for his salary. At the close of the conference year, on the twenty-sixth day of August, 1845, he was married by the Rev. S. W. D. Chase, his presiding elder, to Miss Lucy Kelsall, at the residence of her father, in Randolph County, and she has been his good and helpful wife ever since. At the next conference Mr. Guthrie was elected and ordained an elder. For the next year he was appointed to the Nashville circuit, and during the following year to the Sparta circuit, where he promptly began his labor. But at the second quarterly meeting he found his pay so small that he was obliged to resign his charge and work for his support. He rented a small farm, the one formerly owned and occupied by his father-in-law, then recently deceased. His worldly goods were then very few, and he and his wife and child were forced to live for some time on corn bread. But he was fortunate enough in February to kill three deer, which greatly assisted him. He worked hard and succeeded well, and by the nest conference he was free from all financial embarrassments and again went into the work of the ministry. He was appointed to Rushville station, in Schuyler County, but at the end of the year was again in financial difficulty. The year following he was appointed to the Beardstown circuit, but his financial embarrassments became so groat that he requested to be located, and went to work at his trade, carpentering and plastering. He worked at Beardstown in the winter, daring the day, and preached every other evening, as a great revival of religion was in progress there. Rev. Mr. Rucker and himself conducted the exercises, and great good was accomplished. By the time the conference met during the following summer, he had relieved himself of his financial troubles by his hard labor, and was again ready to work in the ranks of the itinerants. He was appointed to the Springfield station, where he labored with success for two years. After this he was appointed to fill the East Charge in Jacksonville, which he did for one year very pleasantly and successfully. In the following year he was appointed agent to sell scholarships for the Illinois Conference Female College. This was done against his better judgment, at the request of Rev. J. F. Jacques, the President of the institution, and J3. Newman, the financial agent. After this appointment was made, while Mr. Guthrie was returning from •Jacksonville, in company with Rev. William Hindall, Dr. J. C. FioJey and Samuel Elliott, Dr. Finley said : " Guthrie, I th-thfhink the B-Bishop has spoiled a t-t-tolerable good pr-preacher to m-makea v-very poor agent," to which Mr. Guthrie replied : " I fear so, Doctor." The appointment was not a success, and that year ended his work as a financial asrent.

The following year he was appointed presiding elder of the Quincy district, and traveled it for three years in succession. He felt greatly encouraged with the prosperity of the church in most of the pastoral charges. Rushville, Mt. Sterling, Clayton, Columbus, Menden and Plymouth all had special visitations of grace and a large increase in membership. But the salary was small, and after three years he was changed to Decatur station. Here he spent one of the happiest and most successful years of his life. The church enjoyed a revival and paid off a debt on its property of more than four hundred dollars. He says "there is no more warm-hearted people for a minister to labor with in the Illinois Conference than is found in the Methodist church and congregation of Decatur." In the fall of 1858, Mr. Guthrie was appointed to the charge of the Bloomington district as presiding elder, and was continued at that work for four years. During that period nearly every charge in the district enjoyed revivals. The charge at Bloomington, under Rev. I. C. Kimber, and afterwards under Rev. L. C. Pitner, and the charge at Leroy, under Rev. Ira Emerson enjoyed very extensive revivals.

During those four years Mr. Guthrie laid up enough money on a salary of nine hundred dollars to buy a quarter section of land to which he could retire when age or infirmity should prevent him from continuing his labors in the ministry. It is the southwest quarter of section eleven, in Belleflower township, McLean County, and cost four dollars per acre.

In 1868, at the urgent solicitations of his frieuds, Mr. Guthrie became a candidate for the office of Circuit Clerk of McLean County. He was elected and held his office four years, He never held any other public office, and at the expiration of his term did not come forward for re-election.

Robert Elton Guthrie is five feet and eleven inches in height, is well set, well proportioned, and has a broad chest and broad shoulders. His hair was dark when young, but now is rather gray. He has a high forehead, hazel eyes, good countenance, and a healthy constitution. As will be seen in this sketch, he prizes very highly his Christian experience, and wishes to see the power and influence of Christianity extended.

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